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SSA Grids

SSA Medical Vocational Guidelines

In this area of our website, we are going to analyze the SSA Grids. The official term is the Social Security Medical Vocational Guidelines. Internally, the Agency refers to them as the Med Voc rules. The street term is the SSA Grids. They call it the Grids because the citation in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) is exactly that. The explanation in the CFR is followed by a display of rows and columns which refer to one’s age, education, and transferability of skill, etc. Now if we tell you that your claim will or should “Grid-Out”, that means that your case is eligible for an award based on the Grids. Don’t worry, if you keep reading, we’ll explain.

What are the Grids?

The Social Security Disability Regulations were drafted and passed by Congress in the late 1960s. They were drafted during the time in which the booming US economy was overwhelmingly a manufacturing-based economy. It is nothing like that now and for that reason and that excuse, the Agency has been itching for decades to eliminate the Grids. Fortunately, because of public backlash they have thus far been tempered and muted in their efforts.

The Grids is a recognition by the drafters of the Regulations that as working Americans age, certain medical impairments and limitations make it much more difficult for them to adapt and re-tool enough to compete with younger workers. The Grids recognize that as we age, our skills and ability to learn new skills diminish, and we can therefore be found disabled based on our current limitations, the type of work we performed in the past, and one’s ability to adapt to other work.

Now we realize that’s a mouthful. But make no mistake, absent the Grid Rules, the Agency would gleefully deny tens of thousands of claims every year on the basis that long-time, hard-working Americans, can put pencils in a box for minimum wage. Many practitioners analyze the Grids based on one’s exertional capacity. We analyze them based on your age, because that’s where the rubber meets the road. Let us begin.

Exertional Categories

There are four (4) exertional categories within the SSA Regulations. These categories come straight from the Department of Labor’s Directory of Occupational Titles. The four exertional categories are: Heavy Work, Medium Work, Light Work, and Sedentary Work. Each one of these has a specific definition that we explain below. In each one, there must be the ability to perform work on a sustained basis which means eight hours a day, five days a week with a half hour for lunch and a 10-minute break in the morning hours or before lunch, and another 10-minute break in the afternoon hours, or after lunch.

Keep in mind that under the SSA Regulations, the medical evaluators that we reference in this section refer not to your doctors, but to the Medical Advisor at DDS if your case is at the Initial or Reconsideration Levels, or the ALJ if your case is at the Hearing Level. It is worth noting is that if these medical evaluators are of the opinion and/or make a finding that you can function at a certain exertional category, then by definition you can also function at exertional categories that are less strenuous.

For example, if a DDS evaluator believes you have the capacity for Light Work, then by Regulation and definition, you have the capacity for Sedentary work. By contrast, if that same evaluator or the ALJ determined that you have the capacity for Light Work, the Regulations do not allow for a finding of a Medium Work capacity, because a Medium Work capacity is a more strenuous exertion level.

Let’s evaluate the four Exertional Levels. They can be found in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Section 416.967.

Heavy Work

Heavy Work means that in an eight-hour (8) day, you are on your feet for the entire eight hours with two breaks of 10-minutes length. Heavy Work means you are required to lift and carry 50 pounds frequently, and 100 pounds occasionally. Frequently means two-thirds (2/3) of the day. Occasionally means one-third (1/3) of the day. When we break that down further and you factor in the two breaks, the actual numbers appear below:

Heavy Work
Standing: 7hrs. 40 MinsSeated: 0
Lifting
100 Pounds50 Pounds25 Pounds10 Pounds
2hrs. 30 Mins5hrs. 10 Mins

Medium Work

Medium Work means that in an eight-hour (8) day, you are working on your feet for six (6) of the eight hours with two 10-minute breaks, and you may be sitting for up to two hours. Depending on the job, you may be on your feet for the entire 8-hour shift. Medium work means you are required to lift and carry 25 pounds frequently, and 50 pounds occasionally:

If you’ve ever gone to a nursery on a busy weekend, and you’ve purchased fertilizer or any other type of yard items that are heavy, and someone from the store assisted you in getting them on your car or truck, don’t look now, but that’s pretty much an example of Medium Work. Once again, when we break that down further and you factor in the two breaks, the actual numbers appear below:

Medium Work
Standing: 5hrs. 40 MinsSeated: 2 Hours +
Lifting
100 Pounds50 Pounds25 Pounds10 Pounds
2hrs. 30 Mins5hrs. 10 Mins

Light Work

Light Work is not the same as “Light Duty”. Light duty is a term that just about every company in the United States uses, but it means different things to different companies. Light Work under the Code of Federal Regulations and the Directory of Occupational Titles means that in an eight-hour (8) day, you are working on your feet for six (6) of the eight hours with two 10-minute breaks, and you may be sitting for up to two hours. Once again, depending on the job, you may be on your feet for the entire 8-hour shift. Light work requires you to lift and carry 10 pounds frequently, and 20 pounds occasionally.

If you’ve ever gone into a fast-food restaurant, the individual taking and servicing your order behind the counter is pretty much a classic example of Light Work. We break it down for you below:

Light Work
Standing: 5hrs. 40 MinsSeated: 2 Hours or less
Lifting
100 Pounds50 Pounds25 Pounds10 Pounds
2hrs. 30 Mins5hrs. 10 Mins

Sedentary Work

Sedentary Work is the least exertional type of work within the US economy, and SSA’s analysis. Sedentary Work under the Code of Federal Regulations and the Directory of Occupational Titles means that in an eight-hour day, you are working in a seated position for more than six (6) hours. The other two hours can be spent either sitting, standing, or walking:

Sedentary Work
Standing: 2hrs or lessSeated: 6 Hours or more
Lifting
100 Pounds50 Pounds25 Pounds10 Pounds
2hrs. 30 Mins

What’s most important to understand about Sedentary Work, is that if the job description requires you to be standing or walking for one minute more than two hours, it can no longer be classified as a Sedentary occupation, and by definition it is now considered Light Work under the DOT and CFR.

Exertional vs. Non-Exertional Limitations

As we explained in other portions of our website, in order to understand the Grids, you must first understand the difference between exertional and non-exertional limitations (restrictions). The Grids only apply to clients who allege exertional limitations. Exertional limitations are restrictions in your ability to sit, stand, walk, carry, lift, push, pull etc. If your disabling condition is of a psychiatric nature, then the Grids won’t apply irrespective of your status as an older Disabled American. Why? Because a psychiatric disorder or diagnosis does not have any impact on your ability to lift, sit, stand, etc. Similarly, if you have a disorder involving your vision, the Grids also do not apply to you. Your visual limitations and your lack of visual acuity may affect your ability to walk and not bump into things, but it medically has no effect on your ability to sit, stand, walk, push, pull, etc.

We have clients who are primarily alleging disability from a psychiatric standpoint who then tell us they have issues with their knees, back etc. Absent alleging these disabling conditions and having sufficient medical proof in the form of an MRI and other testing, the Agency will consider these impairments to be non-severe. So if you allege a co-morbid impairment which includes a psychiatric disorder, the physical disorder that is tagging along must be severe enough to overcome that initial SSA threshold definition of being “a medically determinable severe impairment.” In short, in order to meet a Grid Rule, you must have a disabling condition that affects you in a physical manner.

The Grids

When we are preparing for and analyzing the particulars of any given case in which a Grid Rule might apply, we analyze these rules not based on your would-be exertional capability that we described previously, but on your age. This is because the Grids don’t really start to have meat on the bones until you attain age 55.

Let’s start by analyzing the Grid Rules for younger individuals.

Younger Individual (18-49)

A younger individual is an American who is age 49 or younger at either their Date of Disability (DOD or onset) or on the date that SSA makes the medical analysis. In other words, if your case is at the Initial or Reconsideration level and the DDS examiners have all the medical records and evidence in their possession, they are now in a position to make the medical analysis.

For applicants who are a younger individual, the Grids are no friend or ally. For example, if the Agency evaluators believe you have the capacity for Medium Work, there’s not a single Grid Rule that will allow for a finding of Disabled. If you have a limited education, and an unskilled work history, the Grid Rules within a Medium work capacity direct a finding of Not Disabled. Below is the chart for younger individuals who are capable of Medium Work as far as Agency evaluators are concerned:

RuleAgeEducationPrevious work experienceDecision
203.25Younger individualLimited or lessUnskilled or noneNot Disabled
203.26Younger individualLimited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot Disabled
203.27Younger individualLimited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot Disabled
203.28Younger individualHigh school graduate or moreUnskilled or noneNot Disabled
203.29Younger individualHigh school graduate or more—does not provide for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot Disabled
203.30Younger individualHigh school graduate or more—does not provide for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot Disabled
203.31Younger individualHigh school graduate or more—provides for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot Disabled

As you can see, not a single Grid rule directs a finding of Disabled. As a younger individual, you don’t fare any better if these same evaluators make a finding that you’re capable of Light Work. Even if you’re illiterate, and your past work has been unskilled or you have no past work, the Grids direct a finding of Not Disabled. See below:

RuleAgeEducationPrevious work experienceDecision
202.16Younger individualIlliterateUnskilled or noneNot Disabled
202.17Younger individualLimited or Marginal, but not illiterateUnskilled or noneNot Disabled
202.18Younger individualLimited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot Disabled
202.19Younger individualLimited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot Disabled
202.20Younger individualHigh school graduate or moreUnskilled or noneNot Disabled
202.21Younger individualHigh school graduate or moreSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot Disabled
202.22Younger individualHigh school graduate or moreSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot Disabled

While Oz never did give anything to the Tin Man that he didn’t, didn’t already have, the same goes for him giving you a Grid Rule to apply if you’re a younger individual. Similarly, if you were thinking there was a Social Security Grid God, you’d be wrong there too. Why? Because the only Grid Rule for a younger individual that directs a finding of Disabled is one who is illiterate and has unskilled past work.

Of course, if you were illiterate, you wouldn’t be able to read any content on this website, let alone the rule below. What we at the Social Security Law Group find very intriguing is that based on the highlighted Grid Rule below, the Agency must be of the opinion that one can be illiterate and have a semi-skilled past work history. Is that even possible? If it is…God Bless America!

RuleAgeEducationPrevious work experienceDecision
201.17Younger individual age 45-49IlliterateUnskilled or noneDisabled
201.18Younger individual age 45-49Limited or Marginal, but not illiterateUnskilled or noneNot disabled
201.19Younger individual age 45-49Limited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot Disabled
201.20Younger individual age 45-49Limited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot Disabled
201.21Younger individual age 45-49High school graduate or moreSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot Disabled
201.22Younger individual age 45-49High school graduate or moreSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot Disabled
201.23Younger individual age 18-44IlliterateUnskilled or noneNot Disabled
201.24Younger individual age 18-44Limited or Marginal, but not illiterateUnskilled or noneNot Disabled
201.25Younger individual age 18-44Limited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot Disabled
201.26Younger individual age 18-44Limited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot Disabled
201.27Younger individual age 18-44High school graduate or moreUnskilled or noneNot Disabled
201.28Younger individual age 18-44High school graduate or moreSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot Disabled
201.29Younger individual age 18-44High school graduate or moreSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot Disabled

Closely Approaching Advanced Age (50-54)

We don’t want to make you feel old, but when you’ve hit the big 5-0, The Agency considers you Approaching Advanced Age. As we stated earlier, these Regulations were written in the 1970s when the SSA Retirement age was 65, and the American life expectancy wasn’t as robust as it is today.

For applicant’s who are APPROACHING ADVANCED AGE, there is some relief and applicability to the Grids, but not just yet. As you’ll see in our further analysis, it depends on your past work history.

Once again, let’s start with a Medium Work capacity. If the Agency evaluators believe you have the capacity for Medium Work, there’s not a single Grid Rule that will allow for a finding of Disabled, even if you have a limited education, and an unskilled work history.

RuleAgeEducationPrevious work experienceDecision
203.18Closely approaching advanced ageLimited or lessUnskilled or noneNot Disabled
203.19Closely approaching advanced ageLimited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot Disabled
203.20Closely approaching advanced ageLimited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot Disabled
203.21Closely approaching advanced ageHigh school graduate or moreUnskilled or noneNot Disabled
203.22Closely approaching advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—does not provide for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot Disabled
203.23Closely approaching advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—does not provide for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot Disabled
203.24Closely approaching advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—provides for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot Disabled

While there appears to be some light at the end of the tunnel (pun intended), it doesn’t help us much because like the Younger Individual, the individual APPROACHING ADVANCED AGE must also be illiterate in order to qualify under a Grid Rule.

RuleAgeEducationPrevious work experienceDecision
202.09Closely approaching advanced ageIlliterateUnskilled or noneDisabled.
202.10Closely approaching advanced ageLimited or Marginal, but not illiterateUnskilled or noneNot disabled.
202.11Closely approaching advanced ageLimited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot Disabled
202.12Closely approaching advanced ageLimited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot Disabled
202.13Closely approaching advanced ageHigh school graduate or moreUnskilled or noneNot Disabled
202.14Closely approaching advanced ageHigh school graduate or moreSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot Disabled
202.15Closely approaching advanced ageHigh school graduate or moreSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot Disabled

When we reach the Sedentary capacity, here is where there appears to be some breakthrough. For example, if Agency evaluators believe you have the capacity for a Sedentary (seated) job, then you will be found Disabled under a Grid Rule if your past work is unskilled.

In addition, and under a different Grid Rule at this age group, if you had a skilled job or a semiskilled job and the skills that you gained in that job are not transferable to other work, a Grid Rule will also direct a finding of Disabled

As we stated in another section of this website, a Commercial Airline Pilot is a classic example. The occupation of Commercial Airline Pilot is considered a skilled occupation and is performed at the Light Exertional level. By contrast, an Attorney is also considered a skilled occupation, but performed at the Sedentary level. The difference between the two jobs is that the Pilot has no other transferable skills other than to another Pilot job, whereas the Attorney has plenty of transferable skills to other types of Sedentary work. If you keep reading the grid, you’ll see that if your past work is skilled or semiskilled and some of those skills gained are transferable, then a finding of Not Disabled is directed.

This is where the SSA Work History Report plays a critical role. The Agency will evaluate your job as listed in the Directory of Occupational titles, as well as how you actually performed it. The execution of your job may be slightly different than as described in the DOT. If you receive an SSA Work History Report, and you’re age 50+, this is where we will be in direct consult with you to ensure that you list those jobs accurately, and appropriately. If you weren’t a Supervisor, nor had any real transferable skills, don’t indicate that you did, because it may actually be detrimental to your case.

RuleAgeEducationPrevious work experienceDecision
201.09Closely approaching advanced ageLimited or lessUnskilled or noneDisabled
201.10Closely approaching advanced ageLimited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableDisabled
201.11Closely approaching advanced ageLimited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot disabled
201.12Closely approaching advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—does not provide for direct entry into skilled workUnskilled or noneDisabled
201.13Closely approaching advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—provides for direct entry into skilled workUnskilled or noneNot disabled
201.14Closely approaching advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—does not provide for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableDisabled
201.15Closely approaching advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—does not provide for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot disabled
201.16Closely approaching advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—provides for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot disabled

Advanced Age (55-59)

When you’ve reached the age of 55, the Agency considers you to have attained Advanced Age. The Grid Rules are much more applicable to applicant’s who’ve reached Advanced Age.

Once again, at Medium Work capacity, forget about the Grid Rules. It is nearly impossible to be approved for Social Security Disability if the evaluators believe you can perform Medium Work. Even if you’re 59, unless you have no past work, then you’re not going to be approved for SSDI, plain and simple.

RuleAgeEducationPrevious work experienceDecision
203.10Advanced ageLimited or lessNoneDisabled.
203.11Advanced ageLimited or lessUnskilledNot disabled.
203.12Advanced ageLimited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot disabled.
203.13Advanced ageLimited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot disabled.
203.14Advanced ageHigh school graduate or moreUnskilled or noneNot disabled.
203.15Advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—does not provide for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot disabled.
203.16Advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—does not provide for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot disabled.
203.17Advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—provides for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot disabled.

At the Light Work capacity, we see once again, that unless your skills are considered non-transferrable, you can’t be found Disabled under a Grid Rule. There are plenty of Americans who’ve succeeded in their careers with a limited education. But even these people must have succeeded in jobs in which the skills they garnered are not transferrable to other work.

RuleAgeEducationPrevious work experienceDecision
202.01Advanced ageLimited or lessUnskilled or noneDisabled.
202.02Advanced ageLimited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableDisabled
202.03Advanced ageLimited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot disabled.
202.04Advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—does not provide for direct entry into skilled workUnskilled or noneDisabled.
202.05Advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—provides for direct entry into skilled workUnskilled or noneNot disabled.
202.06Advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—does not provide for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableDisabled.
202.07Advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—does not provide for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot disabled.
202.08Advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—provides for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot disabled.

We discussed the Pilot and the Attorney, now let’s take a look at another such example as it may clarify the point: Route Truck Driver. DOT Code: 292.353-010

We’ve highlighted the exertional demands in red. The potential transferable skills in green.

Drives truck or automobile over established route to deliver and sell products or render services, collects money from customers, and makes change: Drives truck to deliver such items as beer, soft drinks, bakery products, dry cleaning, laundry, specialty foods, and medical supplies to customer’s home or place of business. Collects money from customers, makes change, and records transactions on customer receipt. Writes customer order and instructions. Records sales or deliveries information on daily sales or delivery record. Calls on prospective customers to solicit new business. Prepares order forms and sales contracts. Informs regular customers of new products or services. Listens to and resolves service complaints. May place stock on shelves or racks. May set up merchandise and sales promotion displays or issue sales promotion materials to customers. May collect or pick-up empty containers or rejected or unsold merchandise. May load truck. May issue or obtain customer signature on receipt for pickup or delivery. May clean inside of truck. May perform routine maintenance on truck. May direct DRIVER HELPER, SALES ROUTE (retail trade; wholesale tr.) 292.667-010 to load and unload truck and carry merchandise. May be designated according to product delivered or service rendered.

If you notice, the job description lists tasks such as collects money and records transactions and writes customer orders etc. This is where it’s important to understand that in many cases, these companies issue the worker an electronic tablet of some other kind of gadget, and all of the skill has been removed from the job and the driver simply makes the entries on the tablet. It is the tablet, and not the worker, that performs all the skill. This is why we state that the SSA Work History Report is critical in this analysis.

At the Sedentary exertional level, the Grid Rules mimic those at the Light level. Once again, if your past work history is considered unskilled then it’s likely you’ll be found disabled based on a Grid Rule. If it’s skilled or semiskilled however, we will only be able to argue a Grid Rule if we can demonstrate that those skills that you gained in those jobs are not transferable.

RuleAgeEducationPrevious work experienceDecision
201.01Advanced ageLimited or lessUnskilled or noneDisabled
201.02Advanced ageLimited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableDisabled
201.03Advanced ageLimited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot disabled
201.04Advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—does not provide for direct entry into skilled workUnskilled or noneDisabled
201.05Advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—provides for direct entry into skilled workUnskilled or noneNot disabled
201.06Advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—does not provide for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableDisabled
201.07Advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—does not provide for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot disabled
201.08Advanced ageHigh school graduate or more—provides for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot Disabled

Most importantly, if you’re an Applicant of Advanced Age, not only must your skills be transferable, there is a major additional consideration. Under the Regulations, an individual will be found to have transferable skills to other work only if the Sedentary work is so similar to the individual’s previous work that he or she would need to make very little, if any, vocational adjustment in terms of tools, work processes, work settings, or the industry.

This is why it’s critical that the skilled Attorneys of SOCIAL SECURITY LAW GROUP® marshal you through his SSDI process.

Approaching Retirement Age (60-67)

When you’ve reached the age of 60, you are pretty much on your way to Retirement and transferability of skill is the rule, not the exception. While the normal retirement age was 65, for many Americans reading this, your Retirement age has been adjusted based on your year of birth. In some cases, it can be as late as age 67. As is the case with all the Grid Rules at all the age categories, a Medium Exertional capacity does you in.

RuleAgeEducationPrevious work experienceDecision
203.01Closely approaching retirement ageMarginal or noneUnskilled or noneDisabled.
203.02Closely approaching retirement ageLimited or lessNoneDisabled
203.03Closely approaching retirement ageLimitedUnskilledNot disabled.
203.04Closely approaching retirement ageLimited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot disabled.
203.05Closely approaching retirement ageLimited or lessSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot disabled.
203.06Closely approaching retirement ageHigh school graduate or moreUnskilled or noneNot disabled.
203.07Closely approaching retirement ageHigh school graduate or more—does not provide for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills not transferableNot disabled.
203.08Closely approaching retirement ageHigh school graduate or more—does not provide for direct entry into skilled workSkilled or semiskilled—skills transferableNot disabled.

Absent a finding that you can perform Medium Work, the Grid Rules are especially friendly to individuals Approaching Retirement Age because essentially if they cannot perform Medium work, then the jobs that will render a finding of Not Disabled must be limited to past work in the LIGHT Exertional category with skills that are transferable to skilled or semiskilled work only if the Light work is so similar to the individual’s previous work that he or she would need to make very little, if any vocational adjustment in terms of tools, work processes, work settings, or the industry.

The Grid Rules in a SSA Decision

If you filed an Initial Claim for Social Security Disability benefits that was denied, the rationale usually found on page 2 will indicate whether or not The Agency applied a Grid Rule. You won’t find the detailed analysis in a Reconsideration denial, only an Initial Denial. So if your initial decision from Social Security denying your claim has language that reads something like this…:

“We realize that your condition keeps you from doing any of your past jobs, but it does not keep you from doing less demanding work. Based on your age, education, and past work experience, you can do other work. It has been decided, therefore, that you are not disable according to the Social Security Act”

This is sure fire boilerplate language that they have denied your case based on one of the Grid Rules.

We hope you found this section of our website informative, and substantive. If we haven’t convinced you yet, please give us a call and tell us what we’re doing wrong. In closing, once again, don’t try this on your own. Get professional help.

Call SOCIAL SECURITY LAW GROUP now.